Skin Health
Are Cheaper Products Better?: EczemaBlues.com Interview
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I have to rebuild my entire stash of products for my child — or my child is so sensitive I may have to experiment with several products. Is cheaper better?

As published on http://eczemablues.com/2012/02/sensitive-skin-product-series-what-ingredient-to-avoid/. Follow her on twitter at http://twitter.com/marciemom.

Marcie Mom: For a parent on a tight budget (also considering long term and frequent use of moisturizers), should he/she start the child on the cheapest lotion/cream available? If not, is there certain baseline to start with, for instance, it must state ‘suitable for infant with eczema’ or not contain ‘perfume’?

Dr. Verallo-RowellThe answer is no. Many cheap products are strongly/nicely scented to cover up for the natural scent of less-pure cosmetic ingredients versus, for example, pharmaceutical-grade or higher-quality or purer ingredients, which are frequently more expensive. Some cheaper products are dyed with relatively cheap ingredients to add attractiveness in children’s eyes. Cheap or expensive, preservation is also problem, as are added antibiotics. All these are allergens and break down the skin’s natural barrier.

Make function be the basis for your choice. Remember that in different forms of eczemas you pay attention to the skin’s outermost barrier layer: genetic innate barrier dysfunction initiates atopic; allergic or irritant reaction breaks down the barrier in contact; food around the mouth area can physically act on the barrier, and secondarily, bacteria cross damaged barrier in all types of eczemas.

Hence to keep the barrier as intact as possible: Place the least irritating, partially occluding product you can find without any of the above: scents, preservatives, antibiotics, dyes. Mineral oil and pertroleum jelly are long time favorites of us dermatologists. They are cheap and excellent barriers, but they are petrochemical derived. Consider non-preserved, non-adulterated oils. For this my favorite is virgin coconut oil because it needs no preservation and is broken down by lipases of friendly skin bacteria into monoglycerides with antiseptic properties. I have a published paper on VCO vs. Olive oil in Atopic Dermatitis that includes comparison on Staph. Aureus action by both oils.

This is part of a 13-part series focused on understanding and using products for sensitive skin, an important topic given the generous amount of moisturizers that go onto the skin of a child with eczema. Marcie Mom met Laura Verallo Rowell Bertotto, the CEO of VMVGroup, on twitter and learnt that her company is the only hypoallergenic brand that validates its hypoallergenicity. VMV Hypoallergenics is founded in 1979 by a world renowned dermatologist-dermatopathologist (Laura's mother) who also created the VH-Rating System. The only validated hypoallergenic rating system in the world, the VH-Rating System is used across all the products at VMV, significantly decreasing the risk of reactions (a study published in a leading contact dermatitis journal showed less than 0.1% of reactions in 30 years). In this interview, Laura (with VMV's founding physician) answers Marcie Mom’s questions on understanding the product label.